Bricolage

Tumblelog as bricolage: a collection of found objects, assembled into a whole, with semantic echoes of literary criticism, pedagogy, experiential education, music, anthropology, and cultural studies. The metaphor does not fit perfectly, of course, but it is a place to start.

Bricolage (brikoʊlɑʒ), as told by Wikipedia: the construction or creation of a work from a diverse range of things which happen to be available; a work created by such a process.

Comments can be e-mailed to 'becca.
Wed Jul 11

(Subtext of TFA, etc.: “Work-life balance is for lazy racists!”)

Roxanna Elden, “Myth of the Super Teacher”

Sat Oct 29

From “School ‘Reform’: A Failing Grade” by Diane Ravitch 

"The [school] reformers like to say that poverty doesn’t make a difference, but they are wrong. Poverty matters. The achievement gap between children of affluence and children of poverty starts long before the first day of school. It reflects the nutrition and medical care available to pregnant women and their children, as well as the educational level of the children’s parents, the vocabulary they hear, and the experiences to which they are exposed.

Poor children can learn and excel, but the odds are against them. Reformers like to say that “demography is not destiny,” but saying so doesn’t make it true: demography is powerful. Every testing program shows a tight correlation between family income and test scores, whether it is the SAT, the ACT, the federal testing program, or state tests.”

"When test scores become the goal of education by which students and schools are measured, then students in the bottom half—who will inevitably include disproportionate numbers of children who are poor, children with disabilities, children who barely speak English—will be left far behind, stigmatized by their low scores. If we were to focus on the needs of children, we would make sure that every pregnant woman got good medical care and nutrition, since many children born to women without them tend to have learning disabilities. We would make sure that children in poor communities have high-quality early childhood education so that they arrive in school ready to learn. We would insist that their teachers be trained to support their social, emotional, and intellectual development and to engage local communities on behalf of their children, as Dr. James Comer of Yale University has insisted for many years. And we would have national policies whose goal is to reduce poverty by expanding economic opportunity."

Fri Oct 21

This… is really cool.

For more info, check out http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/ or http://www.youtube.com/aliteroflight.

Sun Oct 9
camerasaremyeyes:

Things I like:
This shadow is more than it seems — the light that’s shining through the covered bike racks and trees that we see in silhoutte on the east side of Mudd are illuminated from the sun reflecting off of the windows of Peters. It’s a brain twister, in a great way.

I love Ma’ayan’s photos of buildings and landscapes in Oberlin. I spent four years there, yet she allows me to see things that I would never have appreciated or even noticed.

camerasaremyeyes:

Things I like:

This shadow is more than it seems — the light that’s shining through the covered bike racks and trees that we see in silhoutte on the east side of Mudd are illuminated from the sun reflecting off of the windows of Peters. It’s a brain twister, in a great way.

I love Ma’ayan’s photos of buildings and landscapes in Oberlin. I spent four years there, yet she allows me to see things that I would never have appreciated or even noticed.

Sun Oct 2

Eponyms! Full story (“Wanna Live Forever? Become a Noun”) and NPR Morning Edition transcript here. Featuring Robert Krulwich (of Radio Lab) and Adam Cole.

Sat Oct 1

A decade of college and grad school—boot camps of strategic fakery—immeasurably deepened my arsenal: Today I’m proficient in such feints as the stretched truth (“It’s funny, I’ve never actually finished that,” I’ll volunteer about War and Peace, of which I’ve read only the first paragraph), the misdirection (“Have you read Gravity’s Rainbow?” “You know what’s always bothered me about Pynchon?”), and, on very rare occasions, the enthusiastic flat-out lie (“Did you finish Brideshead Revisited?” “Yes! Yes, I really did!”). My signature move is a mildly orgasmic “Mmmmm,” which manages to suggest several things simultaneously: agreement, disagreement, ambivalence, and above all that my familiarity with the book in question is so deep it’s become muscular and sub-verbal, less a literary opinion than the visceral appreciation of a jaguar for the dawn.”

-Sam Anderson, from a book review of How to Talk About Books You Haven’t Read (by Pierre Bayard)

Sun Sep 4
From “Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life in America.”
From the website: “Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life In America is a collection of 18 short films and 80 photographic portraits that represent and archive the varied lives of Queer America today. Photographs and videos will be released episodically online, accompanied by personal statements, throughout the next year. […] With this ever growing archive of words, images and short films, the artists intend to change the way queer communities are perceived, and offer queer people all over the country a chance to speak for themselves.”

From “Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life in America.”

From the website: “Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life In America is a collection of 18 short films and 80 photographic portraits that represent and archive the varied lives of Queer America today. Photographs and videos will be released episodically online, accompanied by personal statements, throughout the next year. […] With this ever growing archive of words, images and short films, the artists intend to change the way queer communities are perceived, and offer queer people all over the country a chance to speak for themselves.”

Tue Aug 30
A Softer World

A Softer World

Sat Aug 27

Teaching a mythical creature about gender performance, social norms, etc.:

http://www.viruscomix.com/page551.html

So much cultural commentary in one comic!

Mon Mar 7

Trailer for the proposed video “Directing Dissent” (if they raise enough money through Kickstarter). It focuses on the life and work of John Roemer, who was my high school Civil Liberties teacher (as well as the head of the Maryland ACLU and activist in the civil rights movement, among other things). More here.